« Surfing the Web is Your Job | Main | Let the Moblogging Begin »

09/10/2007

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c57a853ef00e5506178568834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Bringing Geeky Back – BrandingWire 3:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Lewis Green

Kevin,

Excellent post and good recommendations. I disagree in one area: Technology is becoming much more complex and more difficult to use and that should be an advantage for our IT business. After all, it is making the Geek Squad hugely successful.

Valeria Maltoni

Kevin:

I love the menu approach for contracts -- let the client tell you what *they* value. Matt also talked about simplifying the language, that is indeed a challenge for people who are technically savvy. Tell me why I care that I get this result. And asking customers to help you flesh out the value in testimonials can help them see it.

Michael A. Stelzner

Hi Kevin;

You have hit on one of the key value props of white papers.

However, white papers are not articles.

I discuss this pretty extensively on my blog.

Mike

Kevin Dugan

Mike - Thanks for stopping by and noting the distinction.

Valeria - Testimonials tap into the power of story. And in complex purchases, we're looking for all the validation we can get before we make the decision.

Lewis - Good point. Most of my experience is counseling larger companies and I think when I heard small business, I was probably thinking too small -- SOHO. From that perspective and a consumer level, I think there are examples of both seamlessness and complexity.

Thanks for stopping by everyone!

Martin

Kevin: I agree, back to basics and simplifying the "offer" can be key. By adding focus, i.e., when ITCo becomes known for a particular and positive service/attribute, everything gets simpler: market definition, messaging, sales efforts and people skills included. Martin

Geoff Livingston

I think you are right on, Kevin. If you can't explain it, who's going to buy it. Very rarely is the decision maker another IT person. It's usually a CFO, CEO or the like who says yay or nay to the recommendation. In short, in many cases if they don't get it, you won't get a contract.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Disclaimer: The views expressed on this site are my own and do not reflect those of my employer or its clients. © Copyright Kevin Dugan

My Other Accounts

Delicious Facebook LinkedIn Other... Other... Twitter